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October 7, 2017

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October 7, 2017

Autumn is ripe with allusions to farming. Global traditions sprung from the harvest season may attempt to harken to a more grounded past, but symbols of labor,

November 18, 2016

Our organization has been lucky to have Maya as part of our team for four years. In October  2016, the Environmental Protection Agency’s blog, Environmental Justice in Action, published Maya’s article about NY2X trips and included beautiful pictures of the Urban Creators‘ Life Do Grow Farm. You can read her article here!

May 3, 2015

For the week of April 20th-24th, 2015, NY2X was thrilled to work with tenth graders at Brooklyn Friends School discussing environmental justice and ways to make change. We were inspired and motivated by their determination and wisdom! Thanks to Natania Kremer, the Director of Service Learning and Civic Engagement, for reaching out to us! We look forward to collaborating in the future.

For information about NY2X’s school presentations check out our programs here!

February 18, 2015

Before I signed up for NY2NO, I never would have thought of myself as a farmer. And even though two weeks of living in hard conditions and compost did make me feel like a real farmer, I learned way more from NY2NO than how to transplant sprouts and harvest arugula. OSBG taught me that there is always something that can be done and that needs to be done. On the farm, that means if the dishes are dirty – clean them, if the floor needs sweeping – sweep it. In the real world, it means be aware of your surroundings and don’t be afraid to take on a difficult task. Don’t ever sit around and think “there’s nothing I can do,” because every single person can make a difference. I cannot thank OSBG and NY2NO enough, because they have changed me. This past summer I gained a sense of aware...

February 18, 2015

Every morning waking up at Blair Grocery was the beginning of a well choreographed routine. To the repetitive melody of “Love on Top” our crew of 15 would groggily get up, get dressed, and start our daily routine. Working in unison to feed the goats, feed ourselves, walk the dogs, wash the dishes, the days seemed to float on by. The amount of work that we had daily seemed miniscule and almost enjoyable, with everyone working together and having each other’s back. We got into a rhythm that was fun and friendly and I came to love everyone that I was working with. But that was just during the day. When we weren’t shoveling goat poop or harvesting and sorting arugula, we would have these workshops that would unite us even further. We’d have intellectual debates on food justice, s...

February 17, 2015

After a tour of the levies, the parish, the poor broken down neighborhoods, and the beautiful rich white neighborhood, you can clearly see the boundaries. It is very obvious that there in no connection or relationship between the white people and the people of color. My first night here on my way to the blair grocery I was shown the destruction that really happened. Between roofs that have fallen in, the holes in the side of homes, and walls of houses being held up by sticks it immediately takes a toll on your emotions. Compost the first day was a small part of our day, but instead of working all day we took this tour to get a bigger picture of the destruction. The poorly build levies to the near extinction of the cypress trees. From the destroyed and broken down homes to kid...

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